How To Progressively Replace Parts Of A Complex Laravel Web Application With VueJS

Todo-style micro-apps are nice for demo purposes. However, these SPA tutorials won't help you integrate VueJS into your existing, full-fledged, complex Web app.

Here is a cool and very simple trick I am currently using to slowly integrate the VueJS javascript framework into an existing Laravel Web application. Note that I am not interested (yet) in making the whole app into a Single Page Application (SPA). First, I want to try and extract value by moving a few features from the jQuery mindset to the VueJS, reactive mindset. Then I can make an educated decision on whether to go full VueJS.

A Quick Fix To Codeception's PhpBrowser Throwing 404 Errors Upon Testing A Laravel App On A VirtualHost

Warning: To a non tech-savvy reader, this may probably be one of the most abstruse post titles ever. Sorry about that. Move along if you will, I promise I won't hold it against you.

Having found a dirt-simple solution to an obscure problem I've been having for hours, I felt that I should publish the fix so that it may help others. It's one of those things that take literally hundreds of lines of code to diagnose and just over 10 characters to solve for good.

Ready? Let's get down to it! (TL;DR)

The Problem

So I have been working on Laravel for a few days now, and it is a real delight. Every one of its components is designed in a clean, beautiful way and whatever construed goal you're doing to achieve, whatever methodology you're using, the framework almost never goes against your will. As part of my journey into building a solid Web application, I wanted to use BDD and especially automated acceptance testing with the Codeception framework. For the few who were brave enough to actually read on without even using Codeception, kudos to you —also, you're missing out; install it at once. Here's a sample of code that you can write to test for the login feature of your application:

Making An App With PhoneGap & jQm Part III: A Stateless Authentication Layer 33

If you missed Part II: Loading JavaScript Properly, you may want to go there and grab the code we wrote so far so that you can follow more easily what we'll do in this part.

Today, we'll see how to implement a RESTful, stateless authentication layer in our application. Let's first talk a bit about REST; the acronym stands for "REpresentational State Transfer" and describes a way of handling client-server transactions in a uniform, layered, stateless, scalable and cacheable way. I know that's a lot of adjectives to process so I won't delve into much more details here. We'll focus on the stateless constraint, which requires that the exchanges have no memory per se, they always contain all the information that the other party has to know to process them correctly.

I have tried to simplify my code examples as much as possible. The goal being "stateless authentication", I have focused on that, which means that for now we will deal with "ugly" URLs like https://foo.bar/server.php?a=b&id=123; we'll see in a while how to do the same with "clean" URLs like https://foo.bar/users/bob

The REST philosophy is widely considered one of the best ways to solve communication challenges between a client and a server over the Internet. You may want to read the linked Wikipedia article for more details about the how and why.

Now what we're interested in is the design of a system in which we can "phone home" from our application to an online server. This is needed for applications which have to pull data from a remote host like news items or score boards, or on the contrary push data to a remote host like creating a new account or updating profile information. Obviously such a system must allow for authentication, or we could end up with users accessing or modifying other users' data at will!

Phoning Home (Cross-Domain) With jQuery

Phoning home is surprisingly easy with PhoneGap & jQuery, and at the same time it can prove hard to do it right. What I mean is that on the one hand jQuery provides us with powerful tools like jQuery.ajax(), which we can leverage in order to query our servers; on the other hand, there is a bunch of things we need to do so that our query is not blocked by the anti-cross-domain security features embedded in web browsers like Chrome.